Termes de références du poste de laborantin

 

Réf : 05/VHA/Sept/2021

Projet : NYUMVIRIZA

  1. Brève présentation de Village Health Action

Village Health Action est une organisation dirigée par des jeunes, fondée en 2012, qui se concentre sur la promotion de la santé publique.

L’association a pour vision de créer une société plus saine en apportant des informations et des interventions aux nécessiteux dans le contexte d’une mondialisation dominée par la complexité des déterminants sociaux de la santé en utilisant des méthodes de recherche fondées sur des preuves.

Depuis sa création VHA a focalisé son action sur l’éducation des communautés en particulier sur les maladies chroniques transmissibles et non transmissibles, sur la couverture santé universelle (CSU), la recherche en Santé Publique.

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Termes de références « Psychologue Clinicien »

Réf : 03/VHA/Sept/2021

Projet : NYUMVIRIZA

  1. Brève présentation de Village Health Action

Village Health Action est une organisation dirigée par des jeunes, fondée en 2012, qui se concentre sur la promotion de la santé publique.

L’association a pour vision de créer une société plus saine en apportant des informations et des interventions aux nécessiteux dans le contexte d’une mondialisation dominée par la complexité des déterminants sociaux de la santé en utilisant des méthodes de recherche fondées sur des preuves.

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Termes de références du poste d’infirmièr/e

Réf : 02/VHA/Sept/2021

Projet : NYUMVIRIZA

  1. Brève présentation de Village Health Action

Village Health Action est une organisation dirigée par des jeunes, fondée en 2012, qui se concentre sur la promotion de la santé publique.

L’association a pour vision de créer une société plus saine en apportant des informations et des interventions aux nécessiteux dans le contexte d’une mondialisation dominée par la complexité des déterminants sociaux de la santé en utilisant des méthodes de recherche fondées sur des preuves.

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Termes de références « Médecin chef de projet »

Termes de références « Médecin chef de projet »

Réf : 01/VHA/Sept/2021

Projet : NYUMVIRIZA

  1. Brève présentation de Village Health Action

Village Health Action est une organisation dirigée par des jeunes, fondée en 2012, qui se concentre sur la promotion de la santé publique.

L’association a pour vision de créer une société plus saine en apportant des informations et des interventions aux nécessiteux dans le contexte d’une mondialisation dominée par la complexité des déterminants sociaux de la santé en utilisant des méthodes de recherche fondées sur des preuves.

Depuis sa création VHA a focalisé son action sur l’éducation des communautés en particulier sur les maladies chroniques transmissibles et non transmissibles, sur la couverture santé universelle (CSU), la recherche en Santé Publique.

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TDR du post e de Chargé des finances

Termes de références du poste de Chargé/e des finances

Réf : 04/VHA/Sept/2021

Projet : NYUMVIRIZA

  1. Brève présentation de Village Health Action

Village Health Action est une organisation dirigée par des jeunes, fondée en 2012, qui se concentre sur la promotion de la santé publique.

L’association a pour vision de créer une société plus saine en apportant des informations et des interventions aux nécessiteux dans le contexte d’une mondialisation dominée par la complexité des déterminants sociaux de la santé en utilisant des méthodes de recherche fondées sur des preuves.

Depuis sa création VHA a focalisé son action sur l’éducation des communautés en particulier sur les maladies chroniques transmissibles et non transmissibles, sur la couverture santé universelle (CSU), la recherche en Santé Publique.

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Village Health Action to improve heart health by advocating for elimination of trans fat from food supply in Burundi

Subtitle: Competitive grant awarded to accelerate a best-practice trans fat elimination policy

August 2, 2021 (Bujumbura , Burundi) – Today, Village Health Action (VHA) received a grant from Resolve to Save Lives, an initiative of Vital Strategies, to advocate for policy action that will eliminate trans fat, a harmful additive, from food in Burundi. VHA will conduct policy mapping and stakeholder analysis for trans fat elimination, provide technical expertise to Burundi’s Drug and Food Regulatory Authority, and conduct a public awareness campaign on the health risks of trans fat.

“Artificial trans fats remain a danger to everyone in Burundi,” said Dr. Egide Haragirimana, Chairperson of Village Health Action. “We are creating evidence on trans fats and establishing a multistakeholder forum to advocate for trans fat elimination—we will continue to pursue this work until trans fats are eliminated completely from our country.”

As part of the six-month project, VHA will work with key stakeholders, including parliament members, the Ministry of Health, Trade and Agriculture and Burundi’s Drug and Food Regulatory Authority to support policies that eliminate trans fat. VHA will also organize a public awareness campaign in Kirundi and French that will be promoted on social media and broadcast over traditional media on radio and television. This campaign is targeted at adults ages 15-55, and aims to educate them on the harms of artificial trans fat and to raise support for a best-practice trans fat elimination policy.

In Burundi, the government has not yet made a national commitment or passed a policy to regulate trans fat. This project is an important first step to creating the groundwork for policy changes that will protect generations of Burundians from the harms of trans fat.

Consumption of industrially produced trans fat, which can be found in cakes, cookies, biscuits, packaged foods, cooking oils and spreads, is linked to over half a million deaths globally each year. To date, 42 countries have successfully protected their people by adopting best-practice trans fat elimination policies. In 2018, the World Health Organization called for the global elimination of trans fat by 2023 and released the REPLACE action package.

“There is no level of trans fat consumption that is safe for any person,” said Dr. Laura Cobb, Director of Nutrition and Surveillance of Resolve to Save Lives. “Village Health Action is engaging in critical, lifesaving action to engage with local policymakers and health officials to effectively eliminate trans fat from Burundi.”

Eliminating industrially produced trans fat from the global food supply could save more than 17 million lives over the next 25 years and prevent at least twice as many heart attacks. With support from Bloomberg Philanthropies, Resolve to Save Lives has previously sponsored trans fat elimination advocacy efforts through its LINKS Community Grant Program, and currently supports the implementation of the REPLACE action package in over 30 countries.

Village Health Action joins two other grantees from this award cycle in this lifesaving work (see below for project descriptions).  All grantees will support national governments to adopt best-practice trans fat elimination policies that will save lives, save costs, promote health equity and build regulatory systems that can improve food safety overall.

About Resolve to Save Lives

Resolve to Save Lives is an initiative of the global health organization Vital Strategies focused on preventing 100 million deaths from heart disease and making the world safer from epidemics. It is led by Dr. Tom Frieden, former director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. To find out more visit: https://www.resolvetosavelives.org or Twitter @ResolveTSL.

About Vital Strategies

Vital Strategies is a global health organization that believes every person should be protected by a strong public health system. We work with governments and civil society in 73 countries to design and implement evidence-based strategies that tackle their most pressing public health problems. Our goal is to see governments adopt promising interventions at scale as rapidly as possible.

To find out more, please visit www.vitalstrategies.org or Twitter @VitalStrat.

Burundi: Let’s stand up for Mental Health

With 4 to 6 out of 10 people facing mental health problems in Burundi, a 2019 Ministry of Health Report and a single neuropsychiatric centre ( with two subsidiary centres in Gitega and Ngozi) and three psychiatrists with a population of 11 million, there is a significant need to improve mental health in the country by 1,000 hills.

By Dr Jean Marie Blaise Migabo

Surrounded by myths and ancient traditions, the mental health of Burundian society has been faced with significant challenges for years. For a long time, believed to be a matter of witchcraft, mental illness is still subject to considerations and stereotyping. “Depression is witchcraft” “A black man can’t be depressed after all his ancestors have been through.” Dr Sarah gave some examples in her presentation during a workshop on mental health awareness and activism organised by Village Health Action. This, though psychological and environmental factors are among the risk factors for mental illness. And for African countries like Burundi, which have been faced with years of violence, mental wellbeing has been affected.

It is therefore with this concern that Village Health Intervention has been operating in the area of mental health in Burundi for two years. Starting with mental health awareness sessions co-hosted most of the time in the American corner of Rosa Parks, the organisation progressed to another level: activism. Under these leitmotivs, awareness-raising and activism, VHA organised a workshop on 21 November 2020 at Le Chandelier Hotel in Bujumbura.

Healthcare professionals for mental health

Medical doctors, psychologists, civil society activists in the field of health have gathered around the theme of “mental health is everyone’s issue.” This is because, with 4 to 6 people affected, out of 10 in Burundi, everyone has a sibling facing related issues, though “mental health seems to be on the agenda of health,” said Dr Pacifique Irakoze, VHA Deputy Chair in his opening remarks Calling on the doctors there also consider, when examining the patient, the mental aspect, in addition to the physical one, which is often the focus of much attention.”

As weeks ago, the world celebrated the World Mental Health Day on the theme of more investment in mental health. Our workshop provides an opportunity to focus on how the country has gone so far in offering mental health services to patients and what could be changed. We presented the audience with a number of presentations and offered the opportunity to collaborate as a group in order to suggest potential cost-effective mental health strategies. Invest in mental health through presentations and group sessions, particularly because only 0.43% of the budget is allocated to mental health in Burundi, according to the WHO 2008 report.

Integration of mental health care into primary health care

Suppose there is one investment that will cost less but pay more. In this case, mental health care is incorporated into primary health care, especially as “up to 85 per cent (in poor countries like Burundi) of people with mental health problems are not being treated,” said Dr Angélus Nindereye, a psychiatrist.

But with this integration, “cost-effective treatments that do exist can be successfully implemented in primary health care,” Dr Nindereye concluded. This can also be the most sustainable way to ensure that everyone has access to the mental health care they need. This is because the cost-effectiveness ratio is very beneficial, and even moderate investment can make significant progress,” he said.

This is because such incorporation is available both geographically (closer mental health facilities, patients living with their families and retaining their everyday lives and sources of income) and economically (less expensive than psychiatric hospital treatment, avoiding indirect costs) and acceptably (minimising the risk of stigma and discrimination.).

Key recommendations

  • Primary health care providers need training in the diagnosis and treatment of mental illnesses by integrating the fundamental concepts of primary health care management amongst health professionals;
  • This training is most successful when implemented through ongoing contact and cooperation with mental health service providers;
  • Lively primary health practitioners need to be able to recognise and treat mental conditions (not an easy job, a variety of medical and social issues, mental illnesses are frequently overlooked during consultation);
  • A shift in the attitudes and actions of healthcare providers;
  • Increase community understanding of the need to pursue health care structures for identified cases of mental illness;
  • Raising awareness and training of community health workers and families on discriminatory policies related to mental disorders;
  • Enrol 2 to 3 psychologists in each health care facility;
  • The establishment of mental health units: according to the WHO the creation of a mental health unit at the primary health care level over ten years will entail an increased expenditure of just USD 0.20 per person per year.
  • Creating mental health units: according to the WHO, the creation of a mental health unit at the primary health care level over ten years would require an additional investment of only USD 0.20 per person per year.